crack cocaine treatment and rehab

Modified: 22nd Jul 2019

Crack cocaine is one of the most addictive substances on the planet. If you want to beat a crack cocaine addiction, you’re going to need the right kind of help. For crack cocaine users, it’s highly recommended that you go to some sort of rehab center for treatment.

Crack Cocaine Inpatient

In order to beat your crack cocaine addiction, you should consider enlisting in an inpatient treatment program for as long as you can. This kind of program will give you the best chance of making a complete recovery.

What is Inpatient Treatment?

When you get treatment for crack cocaine addiction as an inpatient, you’ll live for an extended period of time in a rehab facility.

Crack cocaine is a very difficult drug to detox from. This means you’ll certainly benefit from the around-the-clock care only an inpatient facility can provide. In an inpatient facility, you’ll have complete access to all of the medical and psychological help you need to beat your addiction.

Living in such a facility means you’ll also be removed from potential triggers. You won’t be able to contact dealers and you won’t be in touch with the kinds of people who will encourage you to keep using the drug.

Standard Length of Crack Cocaine Inpatient Treatment

How long you spend in an inpatient rehab facility depends on a few factors.

While it’s recommended you stay for at least 90 days, not everyone is able to commit to that length of time.

In some cases, you might receive inpatient treatment for a week or so. This should be long enough for the physical withdrawal symptoms to subside.

Most patients spend an average of 28 days in an inpatient treatment center. Some programs will require you to detox from crack cocaine before you start the program.

Crack Cocaine Outpatient

Sometimes, you might not be able to commit fully to an inpatient treatment program. You might have responsibilities in your everyday life that need to be attended to.

For example, you might need to go to work or school. In this case, it’s recommended that you take part in an outpatient program. It’s also recommended that you attend an outpatient program immediately after you complete an impatient one.

What Is Outpatient Treatment?

When you get outpatient treatment, you must report to a treatment center at regular intervals. But you continue to live at home.

While it’s recommended that you’re treated as an inpatient initially, this isn’t always possible. Outpatient rehab allows you to maintain a fairly normal routine. This is desirable if you need to keep up with your responsibilities.

Some patients find outpatient rehab preferable to inpatient because it’s much more affordable. It’s important to note, however, that outpatient rehab has a lower rate of success than inpatient rehab. This is because it’s much easier to be exposed to negative triggers and to fall back into your old ways when you’re living at home.

Standard Length of Crack Cocaine Outpatient Treatment

When you attend an outpatient rehab program, you can expect to spend around 10 to 12 hours a week working on your addiction. This should last a minimum of 3 months. Some people spend as long as a year in outpatient rehab.

While you can expect to get through the physical withdrawals of crack cocaine fairly quickly, the psychological cravings will last for a lot longer. As a crack cocaine user, it’s also likely you were using the drug to fight an undiagnosed mental illness.

Not only will outpatient rehab help you kick the drug, but it’ll also address any mental health issues you might be facing.

Crack Cocaine Sober Living

After you’ve completed your chosen rehabilitation program, it’s highly recommended you spend some time in a sober living facility.

What Is Crack Cocaine Sober Living?

A sober living facility is a place where you’ll live with other people going through recovery. You will have 24/7 access to the help you need to stay off crack cocaine.

Many people who were addicted to drugs complete a stay in rehab and then immediately go back to using again when they return home. This is because they’re exposed to negative triggers, such as the people they used to take crack with.

When you’re living in a sober living facility, you’re with people who are going through the same thing that you’re going through. This can be extremely beneficial in keeping you on the right path.

What to Expect

A sober living home is a bit different than being in a rehab facility.

When you live in a sober living center, you’re free to come and go as you please. You can hold down a job or go to school. You simply return to the sober living center at the end of the day.

These kinds of facilities are less restrictive than rehab, but there still may be some conditions attached to your stay. It goes without saying that drugs and alcohol are strictly forbidden. There also might be a curfew time.

Ongoing Recovery

Once you’re back to living an independent life, it’s important that you take the right steps to ensure your ongoing recovery. This might include things like going to regular meetings for former addicts.

You’ll need to make sure you cut all of the negative influences out of your life. Sadly, this may mean cutting contact with any friends who are still using drugs. If you continue to associate with crack cocaine users, it’ll be incredibly hard to continue living a sober life.

Take the First Step Today

The hardest step to take in recovering from crack cocaine addiction is the first one. Once you make the call and book yourself into a rehab center, things can only get easier.

Unlike other drugs like alcohol, it isn’t really possible to use crack cocaine responsibly. If you’re using crack, you almost certainly have a drug problem. Turn your life around by getting into rehab today.

Ready to turn your life around? Contact us today to speak with an addiction intervention specialist.

Article Reviewed by Dr. Keerthy Sunder, MD, DFAPA

Dr. Keerthy Sunder, MD, DFAPADr. Keerthy Sunder, MD is an accomplished and internationally recognized expert in the field of addiction. He has earned diplomates from the American Board of Psychiatry and Neurology, the American Board of Addiction Medicine, and the Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists.