drug-use-in-america

Drug Use in America: 10 of America’s Most Frequent Drug Addictions

Drug addiction is becoming an epidemic, with over 70,000 people in the US dying from drug addiction each year.

Its effects are devastating. Drug addiction affects the workings of the brain and body making the user feel numb and eventually losing self-control.

Drug addiction and its harmful effects on the body can sometimes prove fatal. Initially, you may take a drug because you like it and you feel good.

With time you begin to lose control and succumb to its frequent use.

Drug use in America has led to many problems and deaths due to gang crime and overdoses.

Is Drug Abuse Treatable?

Drug abuse is defined as when you use legal or illegal substances in unnecessary amounts. Mostly, people use drugs to avoid reality or to live in denial.

It changes your mental and physical health throwing you in a dark pit. However, with strong will power and medical treatment, you can overcome the addiction.

This article will provide a list of common addictions and their symptoms that can help you recognize drug abuse easily.

Symptoms of Drug Abuse

Understanding the epidemic is important otherwise drug overuse death would continue to increase. In the U.S it has increased to an alarming level.

It is essential to know about the symptoms and behavioral patterns.

Following are some of the symptoms and behavioral patterns of drug addiction:

  • The need to use drugs daily or several times a day.
  • Having a strong urge to use the drug.
  • Taking large amounts of drugs.
  • Spending a large sum of money on drugs even though you are facing financial issues.
  • Unable to socialize or perform better at a job due to drug addiction.
  • Continuing the use of drugs despite the fact that it harms your body.
  • Making unsuccessful attempts to stop using it.
  • Having a neglected appearance is also one of the symptoms.
  • Seclusion
  • Hallucinations
  • Paranoia
  • Tremors
  • Muscle cramping
  • Sweating

These are some of the symptoms that a frequent drug user shows. Intervention can be helpful in some cases.

However, you need to know about 8 elements of a successful intervention before you can hold one.

10 of America’s Most Frequent Drug Addictions

Drug use in America has increased in the past years. There are many popular drugs in America that have resulted in the unnecessary deaths of individuals.

The situation is worrying and each day the number of people falling prey to drug addiction is alarming.

Here are the most frequent drug addictions.

1. Nicotine

Having easy access to this drug has become the reason for its frequent use. Many people despite the knowledge of harmful effects continue smoking.

The use of tobacco is harmful to health as it affects the lungs leading to the development of fatal diseases. Over 40 million people in America are addicted to nicotine.

2. Alcohol

It is sometimes hard to find a person who is addicted to alcohol. It has become more of a social ritual and has engulfed the U.S. There are many negative effects of this abuse.

Apart from affecting mental and physical health, many people drive under the influence that results in death or injury.

3. Cocaine

A powerful stimulant drug, Cocaine increases the levels of dopamine in the brain that leads to various health effects like extreme mental alertness, increased levels of happiness and energy, paranoia and irritability.

Intake of large amounts of cocaine can lead to violent behavior. Its frequent and binge use can damage the heart, nervous, digestive and respiratory systems severely.

4. Marijuana

A highly potent drug and its legalization in some states have led to its frequent use. It has become one of the most popular drugs in the U.S.

5. Painkillers

Painkiller addiction is another rising epidemic that can be lethal in some extreme cases. Drugs like Oxycontin, Codeine, and Vicodin are considered common painkillers.

They are often prescribed but this does not mean that they are not addictive. Patients who become addicted to such painkillers do not realize how much they have become dependent on it.

6. Heroin

Known for its euphoric effects, this drug is used for recreation purpose. In the United States, the drug is becoming popular among women.

It is also spreading diseases like HIV and AIDS. Its treatment is not easy and users often have to undergo a twelve step program along with some medication.

7. Hallucinogens

This type of drug causes hallucinations and is often used for religious rituals. Its effects vary from person to person due to different levels of chemicals found in the body.

8. Benzodiazepines

This drug group is known to regulate moods and help in managing stress and anxiety. Many people who use this drug are unaware of this addiction until they have to function without using it.

Forced withdrawal is dangerous, it can lead to death.

9. Ketamine

This type of drug causes hallucinations or disassociation. Other effects include sedation, pain relief, memory loss, trouble thinking, agitation, increase in blood pressure and heart and depression.

Its overdose can be dangerous.

10. 4-MTA AKA “Ecstasy”

It is sold as tablets and makes users feel peaceful. In some cases, it can lead to insomnia. Some negative effects are sweating, confusion, dizziness, intoxication and memory loss.

These are some of the popular drugs in America. The impact of drug addiction to mental health is severe and should be treated immediately.

Drug Use in America: An Epidemic

Drug use in America has become an epidemic and drastic measures should be taken in order to treat the addiction.

There are many rehabilitation centers built to help people recover. You need to know the symptoms in order to discover the drug addiction. Learn about the various levels of addiction treatment and help your loved ones today.

A little effort and concern can help you in saving a precious life.

Contact us today for more help or information on drug addiction recovery.

References

Why Children of Alcoholics Are More Likely to Face Prison - ATS

Study: Children of Mothers Who Misuse Alcohol Are More Likely to Face Prison

Study Children Of Alcohol Misuse Likely To Face Prison - Addiction Treatment ServicesThe Research Society on Alcoholism recently conducted a study of the link between mothers who misused alcohol and their children’s likelihood of engaging in criminal activity later in life.

Most people are aware of the ways alcohol abuse contributes to crime rates, including DUI accidents, interpersonal violence and domestic abuse. However, parents with alcohol-related disorders can have many more negative influences on their children, including propelling them into early contact with the criminal justice system.

The study of nearly 60,000 mothers concluded that children of mothers with alcohol-related disorders were nearly twice as likely to face the justice system as children of mothers with no alcohol-related disorders. At Addiction Treatment Services, we want everyone to realize that seeking treatment for yourself or your struggling loved one sooner rather than later can help prevent contributing to this trend.

How Alcohol Abuse Affects Kids

Children of parents with alcohol-related disorders often suffer in numerous ways due to their parents’ behavior. This can include direct abuse from parents, neglect, financial ruin, trauma and psychological disorders later in life.

Children caught in these situations often don’t have much choice in the matter, nor do they typically have the capacity to seek help on their own behalf. The various possibilities all trend toward these children growing up with a higher likelihood of giving in to risky behavior.

Here are a few of the ways parental alcoholism contributes to this crisis:

Domestic Abuse

Children often suffer physical abuse from alcoholic parents. Alcohol significantly impairs judgment and increases emotional volatility. Advanced alcohol-related disorders can cause parents to lose touch with reality.

Physical abuse early in life often causes children to develop unhealthy attachments to, or interpretations of, violence. Children with abusive parents often grow up to have difficulties in other relationships as well.

Neglect and Financial Ruin

Parents with advanced alcohol-related disorders regularly fail to complete daily household tasks or other mundane but essential actions, such as cleaning clothes and preparing food. In some cases, parents neglect obligations such as getting to work and paying bills on time, leaving their children with little choice but to endure the consequences.

In these situations, children may go extended periods without clean clothes, utilities, decent food or other necessities. Over time, financial burdens can lead to homelessness, disease and other negative health effects.

How Kids Interpret Their World

Children of parents with alcohol-related disorders often consider their surroundings normal, because they don’t understand the severity of the situation. Kids in these situations aren’t likely to seek help because they simply grow accustomed to their environment.

Not only are they unlikely to seek help for their parents’ alcohol-related issues, but the abuse and neglect they endure becomes normalized. Children who grow up in these conditions are more likely to develop antisocial tendencies and engage in risky behavior.

Seek Treatment with Addiction Treatment Services’ Help

If you or someone close to you is struggling with alcohol abuse, it’s imperative to seek treatment as soon as possible. If children are involved, the need is even greater. Kids who grow up exposed to substance abuse are more likely to engage in it themselves, and this is just one possible avenue of exposure to the justice system.

At Addiction Treatment Services, we understand the dramatic effects alcohol-related issues have on families, especially children. Your children are more than statistics. Help prevent your kids from making dangerous choices by seeking professional guidance in your search for alcohol treatment now.

When Addiction Occurs in the Family, Children Face the Risk of Becoming Addicted Too

When Addiction Is Passed Down Among Generations

May is Mental Health Awareness Month 2017

May is Mental Health Awareness Month 2017

May is Mental Health Awareness Month 2017In years past, mental health problems were treated with an “out of sight, out of mind” approach. People with mental health issues were often isolated from the world simply because others did not understand their conditions. Doctors at the time also lacked the necessary technology or resources to properly treat them.

As a result, mental health patients suffered years neglect and misdiagnosis. Thankfully, public perceptions of these issues have changed, and more people now hold compassionate attitudes toward those individuals struggling with mental illness. Much of that positive change has been led by awareness initiatives like Mental Health Awareness Month.

A Month for Advocacy

May is Mental Health Awareness Month. Throughout the month, mental health providers, researchers and advocacy groups encourage greater public awareness about mental illnesses and the people suffering from them. National Mental Health Awareness Month was first established in 1949. The public’s perception of mental health issues has since seen several drastic yet positive shifts. Mental Health America is the main sponsoring organization for Mental Health Awareness Month, and operates various events across the country each year in May.

Each week of May encourages the public to explore various aspects of mental health and learn how they can make a positive impact at the local and national level. Consider the following dates and think of ways you can contribute to Mental Health Awareness Month.

Mental Health Week – May 8 to 14

This week aims to drive awareness about individuals dealing with a mental health condition or disorder. It’s vital to show the public how people with mental health issues cope on a daily basis. Doing so helps to break down the lingering stigma surrounding mental illness.

One of the key takeaways from Mental Health Week is the difference between surviving and thriving. When we bolster awareness and show compassion for the people struggling with mental health complications, we help those individuals thrive in their personal lives. This compassionate approach also encourages these individuals to seek treatment and support.

Children’s Mental Health Awareness Week – May 7 to 13

Many mental health conditions manifest early in life. Children lack the communication skills and emotional maturity of an adult, and often these limitations prevent kids from recognizing their own mental illness. Children’s Mental Health Awareness Week is a great time to encourage parents to examine their kids’ behavior from new perspectives. After all, failure to diagnose problems early on leads to more serious issues developing later in life.

National Prevention Week – May 14 to 20

The scientific and medical communities have recognized the link between mental health and substance abuse for years. National Prevention Week aims to help individuals with mental illnesses seek out healthy treatments and coping strategies instead of self-medicating with drugs and alcohol.

Substance abuse recovery is a long, arduous road. A mental illness can make it even more grueling and difficult. National Prevention Week also encourages community involvement, the sharing of educational resources and taking time to discussing the risks of substance abuse with friends and family.

3 Ways to Work on Your Welness in Addiction Recovery

“Risky Business” in 2017

Each year, Mental Health America devises a theme for Mental Health Awareness Month. For May of 2017, the theme is “Risky Business.” This year, Mental Health America encourages others to learn about and identify high-risk behaviors common among those with mental health issues. If left untreated, these symptoms can easily lead to harmful coping strategies, such as substance abuse, and a host of other issues.

If you’re interested in hosting an event or participating in another way, Mental Health America offers a comprehensive toolkit for you to explore. Take a look at the ideas included for Mental Health Awareness Month events, and think about hosting one. It is also important to consider the ways that you can encourage the people in your area with mental health problems to seek healthy treatments.

Senate Bill Passes To Fight Against Painkiller Abuse & Heroin Addiction

Senate BuildingPainkiller Abuse & Heroin Addiction Bill Passed By The Senate

With the growing epidemic of opioid addiction, the U.S. Senate recently passed bipartisan legislation to support actions to combat the problem. Known as the Comprehensive Addiction and Recovery Act (CARA), the legislation passed on March 10th was specifically written to help control addiction to prescription opioid painkillers and heroin.

Just What Are Opioids?

Opioids are a specific class of drugs that include prescription painkillers like oxycodone, hydrocodone, codeine, morphine and fentanyl, as well as the illicit drug heroin. Opioids interact with opioid receptors on nerve cells in the brain and nervous system to produce pleasurable feelings and to relieve pain.

How Big Is The Opioid Addiction Problem?

Heroin addiction was once thought of as anStreets inner-city problem that only affected down and out individuals who lived on the street. Today, nearly two million Americans 12 or older are addicted to prescription painkillers, and over 580,000 have a substance abuse problem involving heroin. There were more than 18,000 overdose deaths related to prescription pain relievers in 2014, and over 10,000 overdose deaths linked to heroin. The overdose rate has more than quadrupled in the last 15 years. Yes, the problem is serious and growing rapidly!

How The Legislation Will Help

CARA is a big shift from previous governmental efforts to control opioid addiction. Rather than placing some drug offenders into the criminal justice system, they may gain access to evidence-based, rehab treatment for painkiller addiction treatment if this bill gets passed by Congress.Individuals currently in prison for drug offenses may also receive greater access to treatment. CARA could also provide funds for medication-assisted treatment programs that use methadone and other opioid medications to wean patients from heroin and other opioid drugs.

The bill has now shifted to the House of Representatives. However, it’s unclear if and when it will be signed into law, particularly since there is a similar bill that is currently pending that is focused on funding for treatment for heroin addiction.

Do You Or A Loved One Need Help For Opioid Addiction?

While there may be more treatment resources available soon if CARA or other legislation is passed, there is help now. Don’t wait for an opioid addiction to get worse. Call now to speak with an addiction specialist.

Share this newsworthy post with friends, family and colleagues or anyone who might be interested in these new changes.

Dad & Son-Alcohol Awareness Month-Battling Alcohol Addiction

Alcohol Awareness Month: Battling Addiction And Regaining Control

Dad & Son-Alcohol Awareness Month-Battling Alcohol AddictionIt’s rare to find someone whose life hasn’t been affected by alcoholism in one way or another. Whether it’s a spouse, sibling, friend or coworker, most people have been impacted by the world’s most commonly-used addictive substance.

Alcohol Abuse Affects So Many Of Us

Did you know that one out of 12 Americans suffers from some form of alcohol abuse? That’s over 17 million people in the United States alone. Statistics indicate that half of all adults in the United States have a family history of alcoholism, and over 7 million children are growing up in homes where alcoholism is present.

When you consider the far reaching, societal ramifications of the family disease of alcoholism, it’s no wonder that Alcohol Awareness Month has grown significantly since it was founded in 1987 by the National Council on Alcohol and Drug Dependence (NCADD.)

Originally created to help reduce the shame and stigma associated with alcoholism, the NCADD encourages communities to inform and educate the public about the chronic and progressive nature of the disease of alcoholism and to carry the message of hope and recovery. Millions of Americans are living sober lives in recovery and loving life free from the chains of addiction.

Battling Alcohol Addiction And Regaining Control

The problem of alcoholism is that it often sneaks up on individuals. What begins as a drink or two at parties can quickly turn into a daily habit that involves consuming more and more. Over time, the impact can be extensive – from damaged relationships and difficulties at work to health issues and even serious legal problems. Unfortunately, the grip of addiction is strong, and few are actually able to overcome alcohol abuse and addiction without help.

For those who are in denial, a professional intervention is often the first step in the journey of recovery. This is when loved ones, friends and even colleagues can help the individual better understand the ramifications of their problem. Often this is enough to get the wheels turning that lead to treatment and recovery.

Getting Professional Treatment For Alcoholism

Holding Hands-Professional Treatment For Alcoholism

Help is available. Whether you or a loved one needs assistance with an alcohol problem, this fact is very important. No one has to battle alcoholism alone. Customized alcohol addiction treatment services offer a chance for a lasting recovery. By addressing an individual’s unique needs, causes of addiction and triggers, this form of treatment offers support and care that is greatly beneficial.

Make Alcohol Awareness Month the month that you make a real difference in your life or that of someone else that is struggling with alcohol. It is literally the gift of life!

Call us now to learn more about a professional intervention or customized addiction treatment services.

Help us spread the awareness of alcohol addiction during Alcohol Awareness Month, and beyond. – Share this article with any of your friends, family or colleagues that may be struggling or know someone who is.

addiction in the media

Study Finds Media Skews Depiction of Drug Problem

addiction in the mediaPeople in the addiction treatment and recovery community have long been fighting an uphill battle regarding the stigma surrounding addiction. Although it appears that progress is being made in educating more people about addiction, there is still a tendency to err on the side of criminalizing the behavior rather than supporting treatment and successful recovery programs.

One of the biggest offenders of this has been traditional mainstream media, and a recent study examined how prescription painkiller abuse was depicted by some of the largest media outlets over more than a decade.

According to the study, the number of stories having to do with prescription opioid abuse increased significantly since 1998. Of the sample of media outlets examined, the number of stories jumped from 13 that year up to 63 by 2012, which was an increase of 484%. Two-thirds of these stories depicted opioid abuse along with criminal activity, while only 3% of them offered readers or viewers treatment solutions.

“Results of a recent experimental study suggest that portrayals of successful treatment of opioid analgesic abuse can improve public attitudes toward and reduce willingness to discriminate against individuals experiencing the condition, but only slightly over one-third of news stories depicted an individual engaging in treatment,” explained the researchers.

While most treatment professionals would agree that more coverage of the substance abuse problem is needed to increase overall awareness, having a more balanced and responsible approach to the subject would be a much better service to the general public. The truth is that addiction does not discriminate and can affect anyone. It is also true that prevention, intervention, and treatment are effective and that long-term recovery is made possible every day.

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Overdose Patients Still Getting Drugs From Doctors

intmedPatients who are admitted into the Emergency Room for prescription painkiller overdoses are often still given prescriptions for their drug of choice well after they have had near fatal problems with pills. This is likely due to the fact that ER doctors very rarely communicate with the patient’s prescribing doctor. This significant oversight has caused many patients to continue abusing prescription painkillers and risk further overdose. Researchers at Boston University School of Medicine came to this conclusion after investigating information provided by insurance companies. The study was published in the Annals of Internal Medicine.

“Seventy percent of patients who overdosed were getting their drugs from the same doctor who prescribed the narcotic before the overdose…This signals a problem with the health system, but I don’t think it necessarily fingers doctors as being bad doctors,” explained Dr. Marc Larochelle, an assistant professor of medicine at Boston University School of Medicine.

Doctors who are treating patients that are prescribed prescription painkillers cannot rely on them disclosing the fact that they overdosed. Those who are addicted are not likely to admit to this for fear that their drugs will be taken away or they will be forced into treatment. In order to effectively handle this problem, Larochelle says that Emergency Room doctors and prescribing doctors have to communicate.

This is especially important because the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) released information stating that prescription drug overdoses are at an all-time high. According to reports, 47,000 people in the United States passed away from drug overdoses, that is a 14% increase from the year before. These numbers are only projected to increase if doctors are not aware that their patients are being treated for overdoses from the pills that are being prescribed.

As the prescription painkiller problem continues to grow, medical doctors are being cautioned about perpetuating the problem by prescribing the drugs to people who abuse them, however the problem may be better addressed if more information was shared, such as with prescription drug monitoring databases. Emergency Room doctors, patients, loved ones and other medical professionals need to maintain communication for the safest prescribing practices and to help minimize future overdoses.

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International Drug Abuse Trends Examined

intldrugsmapThe United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime (UNODC) has published information showing how drugs and drug abuse is affecting different countries throughout the world. The information shows a world that is flooded with drug use, but more importantly, what drugs are the biggest threats in which countries. This information can allow researchers and law enforcement to best prevent further drug use and understand what problems are facing different governments around the world.

The drug of choice for the United States of late is opioids. Opioids consist of prescription painkillers and heroin. Addicts in the U.S. have struggled with heroin for decades, however, prescription painkillers have been a relatively new problem over the past 20 years or so. In the nineties, pharmaceutical companies began developing and marketing medications to combat chronic pain. Up until then, people who struggled with back pain or pain from surgeries or accidents oftentimes had to learn how to live with the pain were limited in the number of prescriptions available to them.

When prescription painkillers began to flood the market and promote their “benefits” heavily, doctors began prescribing the pills to patients in record numbers. Unfortunately, the level of addiction associated with prescription painkillers was severely underestimated and millions of people began to develop addictions to the pills. Since then, prescription painkillers have taken the country by storm, moving beyond chronic pain patients and into schools and neighborhoods.

The United States is not the only country to continue to struggle with opioids. Almost all of the heaviest addiction problems in Europe are to opioids. This information shows researchers that the problem is definitely more global in nature, rather than being isolated among a few countries. The focus on eliminating prescription drug abuse and heroin abuse may be more effective if done on a grander worldwide scale.

Drug use throughout the rest of the world seems to vary. The most common drug Canadians, Australians and Mexicans abuse is marijuana. Those living in Scotland are more likely to abuse cocaine, while those living in New Zealand are more likely to abuse Ecstasy. Although the report from the United Nations does not hypothesize why people in different countries tend to abuse different kinds of drugs, further research into this question may help to bring about a solution to the growing, worldwide drug problem.