Addiction Cravings

Tips for Coping with Addiction Cravings

Have you ever woken up with an intense craving for drugs or alcohol? Do you consider yourself an addict, even if you won’t admit it to anyone else?

From 2000 to 2010, Americans spent more than $1 trillion on illegal drugs including heroin, methamphetamine, and prescription opioids. That’s about $100 billion per year. Since then, illegal drug purchases have ballooned to a whopping $400 billion per year.

Answering those addiction cravings can lead to lost wages, hospitalization, and loss of property including cars and homes. So how can you resist the urge to use drugs and continue on the path to sobriety?

If you need to know how to stay sober, this article’s for you. We’ll introduce you to a few coping mechanisms and help you find long-term relapse prevention options.

Acknowledge the Urge

You may have heard people say, “What you resist, persists.” This is doubly true when you’re dealing with an addiction. If you fight the urge to use, it will grow stronger.

If you need to know how to deal with cravings, the first step is learning to put a space in between wanting to use and using. Being able to take a few minutes and think rationally will cut down on the likelihood that you’ll relapse.

When a craving comes up, make a mental note of where you are. Are there certain triggers that are making you want to use?

Do you want to use when you see certain people? Acknowledging that you have a craving is the first step toward dealing with it.

Leave the Situation

One of the best coping skills for addiction is to imagine yourself with wheels on your feet. When you feel caught in a situation that makes you want to use, just roll on out of there.

Leaving situations that give you unpleasant memories or addiction cravings is a vital skill for staying sober. Once you accept your cravings, you also have to accept that there are certain “people, places, and things” that make you want to relapse.

Nobody wants to have to leave their friends behind, but you need to focus on your own recovery.

Accept Your Addiction

The next step in how to fight drug cravings is to accept your addiction. We already said that accepting your cravings is key, but accepting your addiction is a little bit different.

If you accept your addiction, you might want to get treated in an outpatient or inpatient rehab facility. You might share the truth about your addiction with some close friends or family.

Don’t be surprised if your friends say they didn’t realize how bad your addiction had become. Alcohol and drug addiction tend to be isolating conditions, pursued in secret.

If your family has organized an intervention, it might be the perfect time to get started with rehab. They care for you and have noticed that your addiction has gotten way out of control.

Most insurance plans pay for rehab, and there are a wide variety of treatment options.

Attack Your Cravings

The great thing about rehab is that it can teach you how to deal with alcohol cravings. You may need to take some medication to get past your withdrawal symptoms, but that’s something you can talk to your doctor about.

Another way to attack your cravings is to attend local support groups. They offer a non-judgmental place to share your pain of addiction and your hope of a better life.

If your town doesn’t have any drug and alcohol support groups, you can access them online.

You have to be able to tell yourself that your cravings are irrational. You have to take the energy you used to spend on getting high and apply that to your recovery.

Attack your cravings by examining your thought process and orienting yourself toward weekly and monthly sobriety goals.

Find a Fulfilling Activity

When you’re in the midst of a craving, your entire mind is focused on using drugs or alcohol. Wouldn’t it be great if you could replace your cravings with a fun hobby or outdoor activity?

Giving yourself something to do besides drugs and alcohol allows you to dive right into a sober lifestyle. Is there an instrument you’ve always wanted to play?

Would you like to take a trip somewhere? After you give up spending on alcohol and drugs, you may be surprised at how much money you have left over.

If you drink seven beers five days per week and pay $5 for each one, you’re spending $700 per month or $8,400 per year.

Check out this online calculator to get the precise amount you’re spending on alcohol every month.

When you’re contemplating a relapse, think about what you’d like to do with your money.

Prevent a Relapse

Recovery can seem like a long and lonely road, but there are ways to avoid relapsing.

First, you may have to find other ways to deal with physical pain. You could try going to physical therapy, meditating, or taking non-opioid pain medication.

Next, you may need to change your diet. Long-term alcohol or drug abuse can make it more difficult to tell when you’re hungry.

Switching to a diet that is high in fiber and protein can help you put on some muscle and give you the energy to attack each day.

Finally, you might want to participate in ongoing outpatient programs at your local rehab facility. They can treat your depression or other mental health conditions.

Can Rehab Help with Addiction Cravings?

Rehab facilities are specially designed to help you with your addiction cravings. They have a team of highly-trained professionals who are ready to get you past the withdrawal phase and into long-term recovery.

We treat people with a range of addictions, including alcohol, opiates, stimulants, and sleeping pills. Our four locations offer inpatient and outpatient options, mental health treatment, and medication-assisted detox. If our locations are not convenient for you, we can make referrals for rehab facilities in other states.

If you’ve ever considered getting treatment for an addiction, talk to us and let’s hold your hand as you being this journey.

References

most addictive drugs

The Worst of the Worst: Which of the Most Addictive Drugs Are the Worst for Your Health?

Cocaine, meth, and heroin, oh my! If you ask someone what the most addictive drugs are, they’ll probably site those three (not necessarily in that order).

And we agree – heroin, meth, and cocaine all cause thousands of deaths a year. We have death tolls that tell us which is “worst”, but they’re all life-altering bad.

Learn what two of the most dangerous three can do to a user below.

A Quick Disclaimer

It’s almost impossible to rank which drug is the most dangerous for your health. Why? Because of the way one drug acts on someone is different than the way it acts on another person. At least in subtle ways.

Some people try drugs once and can stop cold turkey. Other people are addicted from the first hit/puff/sniff. It’s all about how your body processes things and if you have addiction in your family.

Or if you’re predisposed to addiction from other factors, like your mental health.

That said – we’re going to use data that shows the number of deaths per drug to rank the dangerous drugs below, but keep in mind there is no real order- at least on an individual basis.

The Most Addictive Drugs: Heroin

Which drug have we seen an uptick of use within the last five years? Unfortunately, it’s not something relatively mild, like Cannabis.

It’s one of the most dangerous drugs (the most deaths), heroin.

Perhaps it’s because the people doing Heroin these days didn’t grow up hearing stories of people overdosing. There hasn’t been a famous death from heroin in quite a while.

At least not one as well-covered as Jim Morrison’s or Sid Vicious’. 

There were over 10,000 deaths from Heroin use in the US, in 2014, and the number goes up every year.

Why is Heroin so Dangerous?

Heroin is very addictive, you can compare it to things we’re seeing now, like fentanyl. In fact, they’re not that chemically different.

Both are depressants, which means they relax your body and create a feeling of euphoria. Both are types of opiates, which are derived from the Poppy plant.

If you’ve ever heard of Opium dens in Asian history – these were the kind of drugs they were doing.

However, heroin is very hard to administer. You can both snort and smoke the powder, but most choose to shoot it up – that is, insert it straight into their bloodstream through their veins.

That involves needles, which aren’t something you want to play with at home. Many heroin addicts care more about getting high than the quality and sterilization of the needle, which is how bloodborne diseases spread.

There are higher rates of hepatitis and HIV-Aids among intravenous drug users.

The Addictive Factor

Heroin is extremely addictive. One addict said that you feel so good on Heroin that you never feel that good again once you’re sober.

If it makes you really feel that good, you can see how quickly it becomes addictive.

But it’s not just that. The body builds up a tolerance to heroin as it does with any other drug. As you build up a tolerance, you have to shoot up more every time, to get the same effect.

And since heroin processes as morphine in your brain, it’s like turning the morphine drip to the highest setting – that’ll shut down your body’s processes and kill you just like that.

Issues with Purity

As if all that wasn’t dangerous enough, it’s rare to get pure heroin anymore. The purest heroin is a white powder, but most of the time it’s seen as tan or brownish. There is some that are black – which you’ve probably heard called black tar heroin.

The problem is, the darker the color, the worse the quality. Drug dealers are famous for “cutting” their drugs, which means that they add in another substance so they have more to sell/

Rat poison is commonly found in heroin, as is fentanyl. Laundry detergent and flour are two other, less harmful ingredients.

Yet- you saw what happened with the Tide Pod challenge. Do you really want to insert those kinds of chemicals into your blood?

Let us answer that for you: you don’t.

Finally, some drug dealers put pure caffeine into the heroin. While this doesn’t sound so dangerous, it can mask the signs of an overdose.

If someone doesn’t feel as high from the drug because of the caffeine, they may take more – and end up administering a lethal dose.

Second Place: Meth

It’s not easy to rank drugs. While there are fewer deaths due to meth use, Meth has a much more visible effect on your body. It’s not a drug anyone who values their looks want to use.

It’s highly addictive as well, probably as addictive (if not more) as heroin. It’s smoked or snorted, so it’s an easier delivery method than shooting up.

Along with the addictive aspect, meth restructures how your brain works – and that can last for up to a week after your last dose.

Drug-Induced Psychosis 

It’s common to experience drug-induced psychosis when coming down from meth. That means that your body experiences some of the symptoms of things like multiple personality disorder and schizophrenia as it tries to regain a sense of normality.

Both of those disorders can create delusions and hallucinations. Delusions can drive people to do dangerous and crazy things, like jump off a bridge if they think someone’s chasing them.

You also see the damage of the teeth, the lungs, the nervous system, and the skin in meth users. They famously have sores all over their body, as one of the common delusions is feeling like you have bugs crawling under your skin.

A lot of the deaths from meth don’t come from the direct use of the drug – but what it causes people to do.

That said, the number of deaths due to meth according to this CDC report was 3,495 in 2014. That’s almost a third of the deaths from heroin, but again, it doesn’t count drug-use-accident related cases.

There are No Good Drugs

When it comes to drugs – you shouldn’t do them unless you’re directed to by a doctor. And if you are directed to by a doctor, only do so in the exact fashion and for the exact amount of time as they direct.

The most addictive drugs are heroin and meth, but benzodiazepines (think, Xanax) and cocaine also make the list.

If you suspect a loved one is using one of these dangerous drugs (or any other!) get them to a rehab center, as soon as possible. Here’s a list of centers nearby, for your convenience. 

References:

hobbies in addiction treatment

How Hobbies Help Your Recovery in Addiction Rehab

Hobbies can sometimes seem like nuisances to us. They can even seem like something we just don’t have the time for in the busyness of everyday life. Addiction treatment, however, thrives on hobbies. 

Many discussions around rehab or recovery can have a negative tone, however, today we will be discussing our hobbies and how they can help us on the long road to recovery. 

Before we begin, it is important to understand that the connection between mental illness and addiction is so strong. We at Addiction Treatment Services understand this connection between addiction and mental health, and we want to help you on the road to recovery. 

First, let’s take a look at why hobbies are helpful, and then we will discuss some specific hobbies that can be beneficial during recovery, so that you have a tangible point of reference going forward. 

How Are Hobbies Helpful? 

Hobbies are an outlet that provide us with something to do while we aren’t busy working and taking care of other responsibilities. They keep us active and motivated without stressing us out. While some hobbies are not extremely productive, such as playing video games, for example, they all leave us feeling good and calm afterwards. 

It is no secret that human beings today have undergone the process of natural selection over time. See, we have a drive in us as part of our evolutionary history to seek out the things that make us feel good, such as eating food, drinking water, and so on. These activities activate reward centers in the brain to release “feel-good” chemicals to reward us for doing them. 

Natural selection has caused us to develop a need to do things that are productive, beneficial to our bodies, or that make us better in some other way. Thanks to the reward centers in the brain, we feel good when we do these types of things. All of this is for the purpose of staying alive. Thus, when we do something that makes us feel good, most of the time, that thing is something that is beneficial to us. 

We enjoy feeling productive just as much as we enjoy activities such as white water rafting, kayaking, or hiking. The reason is because these things make us feel alive. 

How Hobbies Help Your Recovery 

One of the greatest fights you will likely face in addiction is the fight of boredom. Addiction treatment thrives on being busy because otherwise, boredom can quickly lead to relapse. However, none of us want to be busy all the time, since this can make us feel overwhelmed and stressed. 

While nobody wants to be busy constantly, in addiction treatment, it is important to have certain activities or hobbies that do occupy the majority of your time in order to avoid the potential for relapse. 

Hobbies can take up a large amount of your time. Running takes a period of time, as does drawing, or becoming skilled in playing guitar or singing. These things occupy our time, however, they are a different kind of time killer. These periods of time make us feel fulfilled and leave us feeling good. 

This is where we need to differentiate between instant gratification hobbies, like video games and watching television, and productive hobbies. Both are helpful, but in the end, productive hobbies will leave us feeling, well, productive, whereas instant gratification hobbies are simply time wasters that do not lead to anything greater being accomplished. 

Chasing this good feeling of contributing to the world, or your own well-being, is the feeling we should want to chase. This good feeling is so different than the instant gratification that substances provide. If we seek instant hobbies, then we will be creating the same patterns of an addiction, rather than the beneficial patterns of productive hobbies. 

Hobbies Connect Us 

Perhaps one of the most important aspects of hobbies is that they have the potential to unite us in community. We are connected to each other when we do certain hobbies together. Connection is one of the strongest weapons in combating addiction. 

Many of these hobbies bring us together for one common cause and allow us to meet others who share our ideas and beliefs. Being able to hike with someone, overcome obstacles on a  run with someone, or meet to play music together can bonds us in a way that nothing else can. Having a strong support system is key to overcoming obstacles in addiction recovery.  

Now that we have discussed why hobbies are helpful, let’s look below to discover which kind of hobbies can best suit us. It can be difficult to discern. 

Active Hobbies 

Engaging in hobbies that get the body moving are extremely valuable for our overall health, especially while undergoing addiction treatment. This is because exercise can help speed up the body’s detoxification process and lead to more positive feelings. 

For some people, running long distances seems insane, yet to others, it can be therapeutic. It is sometimes referred to as the “runner’s high” where they experience euphoria and little fatigue after miles and miles of running. Running can help us because it is so good for our cardiovascular system. It can also bond us with others through trials, and give us a lot of time to talk to our friends and loved ones if we run together. 

While running may not necessarily be for everyone, there are other hobbies that help addiction recovery. One of them is yoga. Yoga engages the spiritual and mental side of exercise. Prostrating the body into various shapes and poses is actually very taxing work, and it can engage the core of our being as well as help us to relax, calm down, and reflect. 

Other active hobbies you can try are swimming, hiking, biking, or playing sports. 

Creative Hobbies 

Hobbies that are creative give us projects that make us feel like we have made something that contributes to the world in some way. Taking an art class, or just pursuing drawing, or writing, or whatever other creative hobby you enjoy is a great way to get our innermost emotions out on the table. 

Along with this, we can bring beauty into the world musically. Musical talent is something you practice, so picking up an instrument or vocal practice is something that you can do every day. This can also bond you with others if you find others to help teach you how to play your instrument, or just to jam with. 

Finally, journaling, writing poetry, or blogging are all great hobbies that are able to get our thoughts and feelings onto the page. 

Hobbies in Nature

Hiking is a great way to connect with nature. Experts often find that getting out into nature is a great way to improve our overall mood. Camping, fishing, or surfing are all ways we can appreciate the world around us.  

Along with this, spiritual practices like meditation are extremely beneficial to helping us be our fullest person. This is not simply sitting cross legged and humming, but more than that, it is simply the practice of being aware at all times, and this works especially well when done in a beautiful place such as at the beach or in a grassy area. 

Getting Help 

While hobbies are fantastic supports for addiction recovery, it is important to understand that you cannot treat yourself with them alone. Professional addiction treatment is the only true way to get help with your substance abuse problems. 

Addiction Treatment Services exists to help you find the right treatment program for you. We numerous locations to serve you and help you on the road to recovery. If you have any questions, please do not hesitate to contact us by calling (877) 455-0055. Please do not hesitate. Get started with your addiction recovery today.

Why it is Important to Receive Treatment for Crack and Cocaine Addiction - ATS

Families Must Get Loved Ones into Rehab for Crack Addiction Immediately

Families Must Get Loved Ones Into Rehab for Crack Addiction Immediately - ATS

Cocaine is one of the most dangerous drugs we know of. It has a euphoric effect and acts as a stimulant, which can be appealing for users. Unfortunately, cocaine is also extremely addictive – even upon the first use.

Although cocaine is less common than heroin, it still presents a problem to the safety of our youth, as almost 4 percent of 12th graders report trying cocaine sometime in their lifetime.

One of the most available forms of cocaine is called crack cocaine, or simply crack. In this form, the substance has been processed with additives, such as baking soda, and formed into crystals. The drug variant gets its name from the cracking sound it makes when applied to heat.

Help for Crack Addiction

Quick and effective treatment for cocaine addiction is essential to combat the drug’s negative effects. Over time, crack or cocaine addiction can lead to malnourishment, certain movement disorders and neurological problems.

Overdose on crack can lead to:

  • Heart attacks
  • Stroke
  • Seizure
  • Death

Speedy intervention could be the key to saving your loved one’s life. Fortunately, there are reliable alcohol and drug rehab resources that can help you find your loved one the care he or she needs.

How to Stage an Intervention for Drug Addiction

People who struggle with crack cocaine addiction often find it difficult to admit they need help. For this reason, an intervention is an essential step in getting your loved one into treatment.

Stated simply, an intervention occurs when friends and family gather together to convince someone struggling with addiction that it presents an imminent danger to their health, and that they can’t conquer the illness alone. An addiction interventionist can coach you through the process and help begin the road to recovery.

Inpatient vs. Outpatient Therapy

Intervention Help For Crack Cocaine Addiction - ATSThere are two main types of crack cocaine rehabilitation: outpatient and inpatient. Since cocaine is so addictive, victims often struggle to stop using on their own.

In order for outpatient therapy to be successful, the person struggling with addiction must be able to avoid the substance in between sessions.

Since the addiction is physiological as well as psychological, inpatient treatment is usually the best solution. This works by denying access to cocaine in a controlled environment, which assures your loved one’s safety.

Generally speaking, the longer your loved one has been using crack cocaine, the more significant the need for inpatient therapy.

Although many people fear reprisal and stigma from entering treatment, it’s important to remember that addiction therapy is a medical treatment. As such, it is completely private and confidential. The professionals at a rehabilitation facility cannot release your loved one’s records without his or her permission.

How Long Does Rehabilitation Take?

Rehabilitation program lengths will vary by the individual needs of the person. Crack cocaine addiction treatment programs generally last from one to three months, with additional outpatient therapy almost always needed afterward.

What to Expect in Crack Cocaine Rehab

Crack cocaine rehabilitation follows a standard procedure that starts with an intake evaluation. In this introductory period, patients get to know the facility and go through a medical physical.

Next, they begin medically supervised detox, which allows them to break their physiological addiction to the drug in a safe environment. Then, each patient receives a tailored set of addiction therapies that help them address the underlying causes of their addiction. This is also where the patient might receive treatment for any co-occurring mental health conditions.

Paying for Treatment

One of the main reasons that people avoid seeking help for crack addiction is because they fear they can’t afford it. However, the Affordable Care Act establishes addiction treatment as an essential service. This means that insurance companies are required to pay at least a portion of the out-of-pocket costs.

The amount that your insurance company pays will depend on your level of coverage. Insurance plans may pay for:

  • Inpatient programs
  • Medically assisted detox
  • Partial hospital programs
  • Outpatient programs
  • 12-step programs
  • Cognitive behavioral therapy
  • And more

At Addiction Treatment Services, we understand that navigating the insurance process can be overwhelming. That’s why we handle the process for you. We work with your insurance company to sort out all the authorizations and “red tape,” so you can focus on getting your loved one into safe and effective treatment for addiction.

Immediate intervention for crack cocaine is essential for allowing a struggling loved one to live the best life possible. Addiction Treatment Services connects families to professional, experienced interventionists person to maximize their loved one’s chances of maintaining recovery. We invite you to contact us to schedule a confidential consultation.

Learn More About the Crack Treatment Process

Can Stress Hormone Help Fight Heroin Addiction?

translpsychIn the ongoing quest for scientific and medical research for improved treatments for addiction, a potential new discovery has been made. Recently, a small study in Switzerland found that the stress hormone cortisol reduced heroin cravings by an average of 25%.

“Cortisol could be useful in treating addiction. At this point, however, the present study is a proof of concept that cortisol has an influence on craving. A potential clinical relevance has to be tested in further studies,” co–lead investigator Dominique de Quervain, MD, director of the Division of Cognitive Neuroscience, at the University of Basel, in Switzerland, told Medscape Medical News.

The study seemed to have limited application initially, as the administration of the chemical only worked in patients with a lower level of heroin consumption. However, as it points out, there are indications that the use of Cortisol in heroin addiction treatment has merit and warrants further research. Details of the study appear in the journal Translational Psychiatry.

While it is possible that a single daily dose of cortisol could be used to help prevent relapse, it is just one of many new treatments being studied. There is a huge emphasis on heroin addiction treatment both inside the United States and around the world, primarily due to the surge in use and subsequent loss of life from the drug. At this point, anything that shows promise in being able to preserve life and restore people to good health can be considered as a potential aid in recovery.

If you or someone you love is addicted to heroin, contact Addiction Treatment Services today to find out more about rehabilitation programs that can help.

CDC Gives Overview of Heroin Problem in America

In the latest VitalSigns report from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), the focus is heroin addiction. Heroin use has more than doubled in the last decade among people between the ages of 18 and 25, and thousands of lives are being lost to the drug each year.

The CDC listed out several points that need to be considered in each state to help reduce the drug’s impact. These include:

  • Use all available tools to reduce the prescription painkiller use and availability, as they represent the biggest risk factor for developing a heroin addiction
  • Increase access to substance abuse treatment services for those abusing or addicted to the drug
  • Expand access to and training for administering naloxone to reduce opioid overdose deaths
  • Increase efforts for reducing harm through a variety of prevention and intervention tactics
  • Share best practices with other communities and help them get implemented around the nation

In addition to the above information, additional facts were shared to help increase awareness. One of them was the fact that nearly every heroin user also uses other drugs or alcohol, and poly-substance abuse also increases the chances of drug interaction and compounding negative effects.

While many government agencies continue to push medication-assisted treatment such as using methadone or buprenorphine as long-term maintenance drugs, we try to help people explore the option of finding treatment centers that use other methods for rehabilitation first. Dependency on another form of opioid should be a last resort for the course of treatment in our book. We very routinely get calls from people looking for Suboxone clinics, and we are often able to help them find other alternatives to consider.

If you know of someone who needs help to recover from a heroin problem, call us today for more information and resources for recovering from substance abuse.

heroinpolydruguse

Nation Still Faces Shortage of Treatment Beds

treatmentdocDespite the fact that the nation is clearly struggling with a drug abuse problem, there are not enough treatment programs to properly care for the growing number of users. Additionally, many families of addicts have not been educated on the effectiveness of rehabilitation facilities, or how successful drug and alcohol interventions can be.

This causes many substance abusers to go throughout life with their problems going unaddressed and some even fall victim to overdose deaths. The current reports indicate that almost 44,000 people in the United States die from drug overdoses a year. The number of people dying from overdoses has surpassed deaths caused by automobile accidents and other forms of injury as well.

Educating the general public as well as legislators on the necessity of treatment is an important job of public officials and healthcare providers. Anyone who is struggling with an addiction to drugs and/or alcohol increases their chances of achieving and maintaining sobriety if they enroll in a treatment facility. However, there is a constant problem with the lack of treatment programs and not enough beds in the treatment facilities that do exist for residential care.

“We know addiction treatment saves lives, reduces drug use, reduces criminal activity and improves employment. The data is there, the evidence is in, but our public policy has not caught up with the science,” explained Paul Samuels, president and director of the Legal Action Center.

There are generally two types of treatment centers available to addicts. Publicly-funded treatment centers generally fill up quickly and even have waiting lists that can be weeks long. Although maybe no an ideal situation, a large number of people are successfully helped in these programs every year.

The other type of treatment center is private pay. While these are often more expensive, it is more likely that they will have a bed available for someone to enroll. Oftentimes these types of treatment centers take insurance as well, and with expanded coverage there has been a bit more access.

In order to put a significant dent in the amount of people who suffer from addictions to drugs and alcohol, more treatment options need to made available. While the current White House Administration has proposed additional funding to increase treatment capacity, it really takes much more of a policy shift to accomplish substantial change. Lawmakers must enact ways to not only make more beds available, but also support best practices that are successful in getting people enrolled in treatment.

Recovery Month Serves as a Reminder of the Need for Treatment Services

recmo25Despite nearly 25 million people in the United States, 12 or older, needing treatment for drug or alcohol abuse, only 2.5 million actually received treatment. This alarming statistic shows that the focus needs to remain on education, prevention and treatment when it comes to drug and alcohol abuse, especially among teenagers.

The Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) released a report recently stating that almost ten percent of Americans, 12 and older, had abused drugs in 2013. Of those abuse drugs, 20 million people admit to using marijuana. This makes marijuana the most abused drug in our country. With two states making the drug legal, it is now easier to obtain and more accepted. However, there are studies being done that look into the health risks of marijuana, especially the risks that the drug poses to children. Surprisingly, there is not a lot of information regarding the health consequences of marijuana on the growing brain, an oversight that many researchers are looking to correct.

Being that September is National Recovery month, it is only appropriate to look at these statistics and wonder how more people can be helped. Drug abuse is an epidemic in this country, but the epidemic has a cure – effective addiction treatment and prevention.

“Throughout our nation thousands still needlessly suffer the ravages of untreated substance use and mental disorders. We must reach out to all people with unmet need so that they can return to lives full of hope, well-being and fulfillment,” commented SAMHSA Administrator Pamela Hyde.

While adults continue to abuse drugs at an alarming rate, the amount of children abusing drugs is most concerning. With statistics such as 4.5 million people in this country aged 12 and older reported that they abused prescription medication in the past month, and 1.5 million people over the age of 12 admit that they are current cocaine abusers, hopefully more people will reach for help as a result of Recovery Month activities.