drug-use-in-america

Drug Use in America: 10 of America’s Most Frequent Drug Addictions

Drug addiction is becoming an epidemic, with over 70,000 people in the US dying from drug addiction each year.

Its effects are devastating. Drug addiction affects the workings of the brain and body making the user feel numb and eventually losing self-control.

Drug addiction and its harmful effects on the body can sometimes prove fatal. Initially, you may take a drug because you like it and you feel good.

With time you begin to lose control and succumb to its frequent use.

Drug use in America has led to many problems and deaths due to gang crime and overdoses.

Is Drug Abuse Treatable?

Drug abuse is defined as when you use legal or illegal substances in unnecessary amounts. Mostly, people use drugs to avoid reality or to live in denial.

It changes your mental and physical health throwing you in a dark pit. However, with strong will power and medical treatment, you can overcome the addiction.

This article will provide a list of common addictions and their symptoms that can help you recognize drug abuse easily.

Symptoms of Drug Abuse

Understanding the epidemic is important otherwise drug overuse death would continue to increase. In the U.S it has increased to an alarming level.

It is essential to know about the symptoms and behavioral patterns.

Following are some of the symptoms and behavioral patterns of drug addiction:

  • The need to use drugs daily or several times a day.
  • Having a strong urge to use the drug.
  • Taking large amounts of drugs.
  • Spending a large sum of money on drugs even though you are facing financial issues.
  • Unable to socialize or perform better at a job due to drug addiction.
  • Continuing the use of drugs despite the fact that it harms your body.
  • Making unsuccessful attempts to stop using it.
  • Having a neglected appearance is also one of the symptoms.
  • Seclusion
  • Hallucinations
  • Paranoia
  • Tremors
  • Muscle cramping
  • Sweating

These are some of the symptoms that a frequent drug user shows. Intervention can be helpful in some cases.

However, you need to know about 8 elements of a successful intervention before you can hold one.

10 of America’s Most Frequent Drug Addictions

Drug use in America has increased in the past years. There are many popular drugs in America that have resulted in the unnecessary deaths of individuals.

The situation is worrying and each day the number of people falling prey to drug addiction is alarming.

Here are the most frequent drug addictions.

1. Nicotine

Having easy access to this drug has become the reason for its frequent use. Many people despite the knowledge of harmful effects continue smoking.

The use of tobacco is harmful to health as it affects the lungs leading to the development of fatal diseases. Over 40 million people in America are addicted to nicotine.

2. Alcohol

It is sometimes hard to find a person who is addicted to alcohol. It has become more of a social ritual and has engulfed the U.S. There are many negative effects of this abuse.

Apart from affecting mental and physical health, many people drive under the influence that results in death or injury.

3. Cocaine

A powerful stimulant drug, Cocaine increases the levels of dopamine in the brain that leads to various health effects like extreme mental alertness, increased levels of happiness and energy, paranoia and irritability.

Intake of large amounts of cocaine can lead to violent behavior. Its frequent and binge use can damage the heart, nervous, digestive and respiratory systems severely.

4. Marijuana

A highly potent drug and its legalization in some states have led to its frequent use. It has become one of the most popular drugs in the U.S.

5. Painkillers

Painkiller addiction is another rising epidemic that can be lethal in some extreme cases. Drugs like Oxycontin, Codeine, and Vicodin are considered common painkillers.

They are often prescribed but this does not mean that they are not addictive. Patients who become addicted to such painkillers do not realize how much they have become dependent on it.

6. Heroin

Known for its euphoric effects, this drug is used for recreation purpose. In the United States, the drug is becoming popular among women.

It is also spreading diseases like HIV and AIDS. Its treatment is not easy and users often have to undergo a twelve step program along with some medication.

7. Hallucinogens

This type of drug causes hallucinations and is often used for religious rituals. Its effects vary from person to person due to different levels of chemicals found in the body.

8. Benzodiazepines

This drug group is known to regulate moods and help in managing stress and anxiety. Many people who use this drug are unaware of this addiction until they have to function without using it.

Forced withdrawal is dangerous, it can lead to death.

9. Ketamine

This type of drug causes hallucinations or disassociation. Other effects include sedation, pain relief, memory loss, trouble thinking, agitation, increase in blood pressure and heart and depression.

Its overdose can be dangerous.

10. 4-MTA AKA “Ecstasy”

It is sold as tablets and makes users feel peaceful. In some cases, it can lead to insomnia. Some negative effects are sweating, confusion, dizziness, intoxication and memory loss.

These are some of the popular drugs in America. The impact of drug addiction to mental health is severe and should be treated immediately.

Drug Use in America: An Epidemic

Drug use in America has become an epidemic and drastic measures should be taken in order to treat the addiction.

There are many rehabilitation centers built to help people recover. You need to know the symptoms in order to discover the drug addiction. Learn about the various levels of addiction treatment and help your loved ones today.

A little effort and concern can help you in saving a precious life.

Contact us today for more help or information on drug addiction recovery.

References

Researchers Advance Methods of Breath Testing for Drugs

chromjournThe most common way to detect if a person has abused drugs or is under the influence of drugs is to test their urine. Results are almost immediate and the process of urine analysis has been implemented in treatment centers, hospitals, workplace and the justice system. However, there can be some flaws in this method of drug testing.

For instance, many drug offenders attempt (and sometimes get away with) circumventing the test. This is accomplished by either trying to taint the sample or use some other form of alteration. Another problem is that the test has to be administered in a particular setting with safeguards in place against the usual methods of tricking the test. Due to some of these difficulties, researchers in Sweden set out to create a test that would be just as effective but would be more conducive to on-the-spot testing and more resistant to attempts to produce false negatives.

Olof Beck, a professor at the Department of Laboratory Medicine at the Karolinska Institute and his team discovered that drugs could be detected by analyzing a person’s breath when they exhale. This discovery may allow police, hospital and prison employees to detect if someone is under the influence of drugs immediately and without having to administer a urine analysis.

The results were published in the Journal of Chromotagraphy. This is the process of separating particles in a solution or vapor. This enhanced form of breathalyzer reportedly can detect more than just alcohol or marijuana usage, which are more common applications. Beck’s study included panels for other drugs, including amphetamines, morphine, cocaine, and benzos.

“I see many possible applications of breath drug testing. Driving under the Influence of drugs (DUID) is only one; workplace, criminal justice, accidents and compliance monitoring of patients are others. For DUID, the short detection time is relevant since the state of influence is in focus, and this combined with the convenient sampling procedure makes it an attractive solution for roadside testing,” explained the lead researcher on the study.

While this testing process is still in its infancy, there are many hopes that it will aid in the monitoring of drug use and prevent people from abusing drugs and getting away with it by cheating the common urine analysis tests.

Recovery Month Serves as a Reminder of the Need for Treatment Services

recmo25Despite nearly 25 million people in the United States, 12 or older, needing treatment for drug or alcohol abuse, only 2.5 million actually received treatment. This alarming statistic shows that the focus needs to remain on education, prevention and treatment when it comes to drug and alcohol abuse, especially among teenagers.

The Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) released a report recently stating that almost ten percent of Americans, 12 and older, had abused drugs in 2013. Of those abuse drugs, 20 million people admit to using marijuana. This makes marijuana the most abused drug in our country. With two states making the drug legal, it is now easier to obtain and more accepted. However, there are studies being done that look into the health risks of marijuana, especially the risks that the drug poses to children. Surprisingly, there is not a lot of information regarding the health consequences of marijuana on the growing brain, an oversight that many researchers are looking to correct.

Being that September is National Recovery month, it is only appropriate to look at these statistics and wonder how more people can be helped. Drug abuse is an epidemic in this country, but the epidemic has a cure – effective addiction treatment and prevention.

“Throughout our nation thousands still needlessly suffer the ravages of untreated substance use and mental disorders. We must reach out to all people with unmet need so that they can return to lives full of hope, well-being and fulfillment,” commented SAMHSA Administrator Pamela Hyde.

While adults continue to abuse drugs at an alarming rate, the amount of children abusing drugs is most concerning. With statistics such as 4.5 million people in this country aged 12 and older reported that they abused prescription medication in the past month, and 1.5 million people over the age of 12 admit that they are current cocaine abusers, hopefully more people will reach for help as a result of Recovery Month activities.

Colorado Ad Campaign Aims to Deter Teen Marijuana Use

dontbealabratssColorado is conducting a powerful campaign aiming to prevent teen marijuana abuse. The state has garnered a lot of recent press due to the fact that they have allowed recreational marijuana use and some people are concerned the new amendment would lead to an acceptance of drug use among teens. To help prevent this from happening, the state of Colorado hired Mike Sukle of Sukle Advertising & Design to put together a campaign that would speak to teenagers about the dangers of marijuana abuse.

Sukle explains that the campaign was tricky because of the widespread acceptance of marijuana in the state. He points out that you have to be careful about how you warn children against using marijuana. Oftentimes children are told things about drugs that are heavily exaggerated or simply aren’t true. When children see that they have been lied to, it is even harder to dissuade them from abusing the drug themselves.

Studies are showing that using marijuana at a young age can lead to schizophrenia, stunted brain growth and a lowered IQ. Armed with this information Sukle created a campaign that would reach out to teens and point out the inevitable. In a few years scientists would be studying their generation to determine the effects of early marijuana use. The campaign is called Don’t Be A Lab Rat and it shows giant rat cages with signs explaining the potential fallout from early marijuana use.

The signs say things such as: “What do the effects of lead paint, mercury, and weed on teenagers’ brains all have in common? We’re about to find out.” or “Congratulations. You’re the first teenage generation living in a state with legalized marijuana. Scientists can’t wait to see the negative effects it will have on your brain.”

The intention is not to scare or lie to teenagers, but to engage their curiosity and get them to realize that they are still developing. Ingesting drugs during such a crucial time in a person’s development can have long-lasting negative effects.