Why Children of Alcoholics Are More Likely to Face Prison - ATS

Study: Children of Mothers Who Misuse Alcohol Are More Likely to Face Prison

Study Children Of Alcohol Misuse Likely To Face Prison - Addiction Treatment ServicesThe Research Society on Alcoholism recently conducted a study of the link between mothers who misused alcohol and their children’s likelihood of engaging in criminal activity later in life.

Most people are aware of the ways alcohol abuse contributes to crime rates, including DUI accidents, interpersonal violence and domestic abuse. However, parents with alcohol-related disorders can have many more negative influences on their children, including propelling them into early contact with the criminal justice system.

The study of nearly 60,000 mothers concluded that children of mothers with alcohol-related disorders were nearly twice as likely to face the justice system as children of mothers with no alcohol-related disorders. At Addiction Treatment Services, we want everyone to realize that seeking treatment for yourself or your struggling loved one sooner rather than later can help prevent contributing to this trend.

How Alcohol Abuse Affects Kids

Children of parents with alcohol-related disorders often suffer in numerous ways due to their parents’ behavior. This can include direct abuse from parents, neglect, financial ruin, trauma and psychological disorders later in life.

Children caught in these situations often don’t have much choice in the matter, nor do they typically have the capacity to seek help on their own behalf. The various possibilities all trend toward these children growing up with a higher likelihood of giving in to risky behavior.

Here are a few of the ways parental alcoholism contributes to this crisis:

Domestic Abuse

Children often suffer physical abuse from alcoholic parents. Alcohol significantly impairs judgment and increases emotional volatility. Advanced alcohol-related disorders can cause parents to lose touch with reality.

Physical abuse early in life often causes children to develop unhealthy attachments to, or interpretations of, violence. Children with abusive parents often grow up to have difficulties in other relationships as well.

Neglect and Financial Ruin

Parents with advanced alcohol-related disorders regularly fail to complete daily household tasks or other mundane but essential actions, such as cleaning clothes and preparing food. In some cases, parents neglect obligations such as getting to work and paying bills on time, leaving their children with little choice but to endure the consequences.

In these situations, children may go extended periods without clean clothes, utilities, decent food or other necessities. Over time, financial burdens can lead to homelessness, disease and other negative health effects.

How Kids Interpret Their World

Children of parents with alcohol-related disorders often consider their surroundings normal, because they don’t understand the severity of the situation. Kids in these situations aren’t likely to seek help because they simply grow accustomed to their environment.

Not only are they unlikely to seek help for their parents’ alcohol-related issues, but the abuse and neglect they endure becomes normalized. Children who grow up in these conditions are more likely to develop antisocial tendencies and engage in risky behavior.

Seek Treatment with Addiction Treatment Services’ Help

If you or someone close to you is struggling with alcohol abuse, it’s imperative to seek treatment as soon as possible. If children are involved, the need is even greater. Kids who grow up exposed to substance abuse are more likely to engage in it themselves, and this is just one possible avenue of exposure to the justice system.

At Addiction Treatment Services, we understand the dramatic effects alcohol-related issues have on families, especially children. Your children are more than statistics. Help prevent your kids from making dangerous choices by seeking professional guidance in your search for alcohol treatment now.

When Addiction Occurs in the Family, Children Face the Risk of Becoming Addicted Too

When Addiction Is Passed Down Among Generations

Addiction Causing Death Rate to Rise Among Specific Population

mortalityratestudyIn general, the mortality rate in the United States has been steadily declining. This means that more people are living longer than ever before, which is often attributed to the wonders of modern medicine. However, middle-aged Caucasian males are not among the groups who are increasing their lifespan. This is likely due to the increased drug and alcohol use among this group as well as more reported suicides. A new study by a Nobel prize-winning researcher was published by the National Academy of Sciences.

According to a recent article, “Death rates for other races have continued to fall, as they have for whites 65 and older. But death rates for whites 35 to 44 have been level recently, they’re beginning to turn up for whites 55 to 64, and – most strikingly – death rates for whites ages 45 to 54 have risen by half a percent per year since 1998.” The research team was headed by Angus Deaton and Anne Case from Princeton University.

This information is important because it seems to correlate with the time that painkillers started becoming more widely prescribed and abused. The late nineties was when doctors starting prescribing pills like OxyContin and Vicodin to patients with varying levels of pain.

There has also been a higher incidence rate in self reported problems among the same age group such as various types of pain, other liver and other physical health problems as well as many mental health issues.

It is slightly ironic that modern medicine, specifically the pharmaceutical component, can be credited with helping to sustain life for some people and end it for others.

Study Shows Memory Problems Linked to Marijuana Use

weedmemoryIn another effort to understand how marijuana affects the developing brain, a study conducted in Chicago explored the drug’s impact on memory. The results were not favorable for teenagers and young adults who used the drug.

One possibly surprising aspect of the study was that many of the youth who were tested had quit using marijuana, yet still exhibited problems with after their last use of the drug. The study was conducted by researchers at Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine and published in the journal Hippocampus. What was found will hopefully go a long way in educating adults and children more about the dangers of marijuana abuse on the brain.

The hippocampus is a section of the brain that is responsible for allowing a person to remember daily things. For instance, a conversation that a person may be having can be recalled by using the hippocampus later on in the day. This region of the brain is also essential for remembering things that were discussed at school or on the job. Researchers noticed that the hippocampus seems to be directly affected by marijuana usage.

During an interview, Matthew Smith, PhD. pointed out an image of a hippocampus. He indicated that this particular image showed red colors, which meant that the region was inflamed. He also pointed out blue and purple clouds of color on the hippocampus which indicated that the hippocampus was shrinking. This was an image taken of teenagers that stopped abusing marijuana two years prior to the MRI scan of their brain.

“So what the findings suggest is there may be a sustained effect of marijuana on the brain. I think one of the main implications; if you introduce a drug into the brains of adolescents the adolescent brain is maturing and doing a lot of things to prepare for adulthood. That can alter the development of the adolescent brain,” explained Smith.

This is one of the first studies that examined the physical effects of marijuana after two years of abstinence. There is a misconception by some people in society that marijuana is relatively harmless, however, studies like the one performed at Northwestern Medicine, illustrate just some of the crippling side effects of heavy marijuana use.

Survey Says that Curiosity is the Leading Reason College Students Try Fake Pot

jdesarpThe main reason college students are trying synthetic marijuana is curiosity, according to a new study by researchers at the University of Cincinnati.

More than 330 students in undergraduate and graduate health programs at a public university were surveyed on their use of the drug. The University of Cincinnati researchers found that 17 percent of students surveyed said they used synthetic marijuana at least once in their lifetime, and 3 percent reported recently using the drug.

The students’ leading reasons for trying synthetic marijuana included: curiosity, having the highest response rate of nearly 20 percent; to get high, for the “fun of feeling high”; to fit in; and peer pressure.

Females were more likely to first try synthetic marijuana at a younger age than males. Freshmen and sophomores who had tried the substance did so at about age 16 and a half, while upperclassmen and grad students started using the substance at just under age 19.

The survey’s results suggest preventative measures should target younger children. The researchers suggested that preventative programs should begin as early as high school. “Perhaps, targeting middle and high school students with education programs on the negative effects of THC is needed to prevent initiation and regular use,” they wrote.

THC, or tetrahydrocannabinol, is the chemical compound in the cannabis or marijuana plant that causes the “high” effect. Synthetic marijuana is produced with chemicals to mimic the effects of THC. Synthetic pot is also known as K2, fake weed, herbal incense, plant food, Spice and synthetic THC. College students get synthetic marijuana primarily from head shops, friends, tobacco shops, hemp shops, online, gas stations and convenience stores.

Negative effects from using synthetic marijuana products include racing heartbeat, nervousness, paranoia, nausea and headaches, according to the study in the Journal of Drug Education.

Study Looks Into Gender and Environmental Links to Drug Abuse

geneticsandaddictionA group of researchers at Indiana University are studying the effect that gender and environment have on drug abuse. The study examined men and women to see the effects that gender, social environment and genetics had on drug addiction. The results of the study indicated that there is a definite link between the three areas of study and drug abuse.

While scientists have known for a long time that gender plays an important role in the type of experiences a person has, it was interesting for researchers to add in the element of genetics. Men and women go about their day differently, get treated by their families differently, have different responsibilities and have different ailments that they are predisposed to. Taking all of this into account, researchers looked at the different sex’s susceptibility to drug use. For instance, men who have strong ties to their families and who are protected by their families are less likely to abuse drugs. Women, on the other hand, are more likely to abuse drugs if they are sheltered by their families. The data gathered indicates that women have too many pressures on them when they are isolated like that and can resort to drugs and alcohol as coping mechanism.

“It is likely that gene-environment interactions may operate differently for men and women, perhaps because they experience some aspects of the social world in divergent ways. In families and communities, for example, women often bear more responsibility for developing and maintaining relationships, and do more of the care work that is required in those contexts. We cannot assume that a social environment that is favorable for men, and thus reduces the harmful impact of a risky genotype, is also beneficial for women, or vice versa,” explained Brea Perry, medical sociologist and lead researcher of the study.

The conclusion of the study was important because it shows people that men and women respond to environmental factors differently. While genes and gender play a large role in determining a person’s susceptibility to drug use, environment factors play an equally large role as well.